Daily News for January 17, 2022

Today’s Takeaway

Unions / Canfor deal sets pattern, establishes certainty

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 17, 2022
Category: Today's Takeaway

Two pulp and paper unions and Canfor reached a tentative deal, establishing the pattern for Western Canadian forestry. In other Business news: our summary of the final TLA panel on modernizing forest policy in BC; the TLA’s perspective; and related coverage by Vaughn Palmer and Nelson Bennett. Meanwhile: paper shortages are impacting newspapers; structural panel consumption is up but production is down; lumber volatility is at a 75-year high; and the Alberta industry warns of soaring power rates.

In Forestry/Climate news: BC First Nations push for forest policy revamp; search for missing Fairy Creek protester grows tense; New Mexico takes action on rising wildfire risk; a new film pans logging in the Tongass; an interview with Asia Pulp and Paper’s sustainability expert; and weather disasters begets a call for mandatory insurance.

Finally, a scaled down Rolls-Royce replica built out of wood. And yes, you can drive it.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Opinion / EdiTOADial

The Truck Loggers Association’s View on Modernizing BC’s Forest Policy

By Bob Brash, executive director
The Truck Loggers Association’s Virtual Conference
January 14, 2022
Category: Opinion / EdiTOADial
Region: Canada, Canada West

Bob Brash

The TLA firmly believes there are progressive solutions out there, that enable the unique and world class skills of our workforce, that won’t put 20,000 people out of work, decimate businesses and harm communities. …Government has the responsibility for setting broad goals and objectives, however, successful implementation lies in collaboration with those in the business, who know what will work and what will fail. Towards that objective, the TLA will work with others in the sector—vigorously, purposefully and collaboratively—towards seeking those solutions over the next few months. This will mean finding the common ground that the majority of British Columbians can endorse as a reasonable path to success. This will also mean, not challenging the government’s broad objectives but rather finding the means within those goal posts to move the sector forward.

Read More

Modernizing Forest Policy in BC: Will it Work?

By Kelly McCloskey, Editor
The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 14, 2022
Category: Opinion / EdiTOADial
Region: Canada, Canada West

Bob Brash, Don Wright, Stewart Muir, Brian Menzies

The final Truck Loggers Association panel on modernizing BC’s forest policy was led-off by Stewart Muir of Resource Works. “At stake,” according to Muir, “is retaining the significant role the forest industry plays in BC’s economy but also the huge potential of the forest bioeconomy.” …In describing the origin of the technical panel that recommended the old growth deferrals, Muir referenced his recent article in TruckLoggerBC. An article informed by a Freedom of Information request. The key findings being that the forest industry was little involved and an external party (the Sierra Club) defined the public process to a great degree and the composition of the committee. …Muir noted the effectiveness of the ENGO “hybrid advocacy strategy”, which involves indirect pressure from negative messaging …and direct pressure on government officials.

Next up was Brian Menzies of the Independent Wood Processors Association of BC, who characterized his membership as “value-added wood product creators and innovators.” …According to Menzies, it was Premier Horgan’s stated vision on a forest industry focused more of high-value rather than high-volume manufacturing—that spurred his organization to engage supportively. …And then all of sudden this happened” exclaimed Menzies. …But what scares Menzies the most is that these so-called  “potential deferrals” are impacting his members now, and supply is running out”. This is because more than 50% of their fibre input is from old growth forests …and the BC Timber Sales program immediately stopped any related-area timber sales. “We’re talking months before businesses start shutting down, not years from now.

Finally, Don Wright, former DM for Premier Horgan, said he believes the old growth and other policy changes occurred because “the forest industry has lost its social licence by not effectively making the case that it is essential to BC prosperity”. …According to Wright, BC is currently spending $25 billion more than it earns, financed by “selling off the right to reside in BC” …monies from the outside being brought in by real estate purchases and related consumption. “But this is living in a fool’s paradise,” according to Wright, “as it’s not sustainable”. It’s also where the forest industry has an opportunity to rebuild its social licence. “This is because the standard of living in a jurisdiction comes from the wages and net government revenue that its tradeable goods and services sector can afford to pay. …In BC, forestry represents 18% of this base.”

Read More

Business & Politics

Spartz says White House plans to raise lumber tariffs on Canada are coming at the “worst time”

By Kurt Darling
WIBC News
January 17, 2022
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Victoria Spartz

WASHINGTON The Biden administration is looking to double tariffs on Canadian lumber. …As there is with a lot of items today, there is also a lumber shortage that dates back to the pandemic. The shortages are forcing the cost of building new homes to go up. …“Things have been happening for a while and it’s bad policy at the federal level that caused a lot of interests to move overseas and now we have supply chain issues,” said Rep. Victoria Spartz (R-IN) to Indy Politics. “Now the Biden administration wants to double tariffs on lumber from Canada. …This is the worst time when we already have an increase in prices”. “It’s just strange for me to see when we have all these challenges we put more bad laws and policies into place.” …U.S wood producers are actually in favor of the proposed increases.

Read More

Truck Loggers express grave concerns over BC forest policies

The Business Examiner
January 14, 2022
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Following two days of intense meetings, the Truck Loggers Association of BC has embarked on a process to find solutions to move the province’s forest sector forward, ensuring ongoing prosperity for workers and communities. Delegates and members raised grave concerns regarding the provincial government’s recent decision to defer 2.6 million hectares of old growth and passing of legislation giving the NDP cabinet sweeping authority to redistribute tenures and unilaterally determine compensation rights of those affected. They also heard how the current path will make the sector “un-investible”. “The TLA will be working collaboratively with those in the BC forest sector to seek possible solutions and find common ground that a majority of British Columbians can endorse as a reasonable path to success. It will also mean having the difficult conversations with those fundamentally opposed to the forest sector, if they choose to truly engage,” stated Bob Brash, TLA Executive Director.

Read More

What exactly is being deferred for old growth?

By Nelson Bennett
Business in Vancouver
January 14, 2022
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

When B.C.’s forestry minister announced November 2 that the B.C. government would defer harvesting on up to 2.6 million hectares of old growth forest, it was reasonable to assume that’s how much timber might come out of the timber harvest land base. …The ministry has since qualified that only half of that 2.6 million hectares is actually within the timber harvest land base, which begs the question: What, exactly, is being deferred on the other 1.3 million hectares? After the deferrals were announced, forestry analysts and consultants, like Jim Girvan, were able to interrogate the government’s data and maps, and confirmed that only half of the 2.6 million hectares — 1.355 million hecatres, to be exact — were actually in the timber harvest land base.   ….“Why did the government do that?” Girvan wonders. “Why didn’t they say to the B.C. industry, ‘we’re only deferring 1.355 million hectares of timber harvest land base?’

Read More

B.C.’s forestry priorities are murky at best

By Vaughn Palmer
Vancouver Sun
January 14, 2022
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vaughn Palmer

VICTORIA — The recent deferral of old-growth logging threatens jobs and production in value-added manufacturing, the very part of the forest industry that Premier John Horgan says he wants to promote.  “Moving from high volume to high value,” is the slogan that has supposedly guided changes in forest policy since Horgan and the New Democrats took office 4 ½ years ago.  But the NDP government’s deferral of logging on huge swaths of old growth last year is already threatening the fibre supply for companies that make flooring, window frames, decking, fencing and other higher-value forest products.  So says the Independent Wood Processors Association of B.C., representing five dozen small and medium-sized manufacturers employing some 3,000 people in the value-added production vaunted by the New Democrats.  …Moreover value-added production is heavily dependent on old growth fibre for its strength, presentation and durability.

Read More

Unifor and Public and Private Workers of Canada reach pattern deal with Canfor

By Unifor
Cision Newswire
January 15, 2022
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

PRINCE GEORGE, BC – Two of the country’s largest pulp and paper unions, Unifor and the Public and Private Workers of Canada (PPWC), have reached a tentative deal with Canfor that establishes the pattern for Western Canadian forestry.  “This deal establishes a strong pattern agreement for forestry workers in Western Canada, giving some additional security in what has been a tumultuous few years,” said Jerry Dias, Unifor National President. “This deal should provide some certainty to employers as we work to navigate fibre access and other issues facing the forestry sector across the region.”  Unifor and PPWC agreed to work together to set strong standards for pulp and paper workers through this round of collective bargaining. This agreement with Canfor covers 900 members at Unifor Local 603 and 1133 and PPWC Local 9 in Prince George, B.C. 

Read More

Paper shortage impacting local newspapers

By Brandon Mayer
The North Grenville Times
January 12, 2022
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada East

A supply chain issue has been making its impact on businesses which use paper products, and the problem has been felt locally as well. Drew McLaren, who is the President of McLaren Press Graphics Limited, spoke with the Times about what is driving the paper shortage. He pointed out that wood pulp is in short supply due to increased demand across many different industries. In particular, there is a move away from the use of plastic when it comes to products such as disposable drinking straws used in the restaurant industry, and plastic bags in retail stores. As these plastic products get phased out and replaced with paper alternatives, the demand for wood pulp increases drastically. Another increase in demand that has been driven, at least in part, by the COVID-19 pandemic, is the demand for cardboard boxes… The wood pulp shortage does not have a clear end in sight. 

Read More

Finance & Economics

Structural panels: consumption up, production down

Paul Quinn, analyst RBC Capital Markets
RBC Capital Markets
January 16, 2022
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada, United States

Despite the addition of West Fraser Chambord and re-start of LP Peace Valley, North American structural panel production was down y/y due to continued supply chain challenges across the industry. OSB and plywood pricing has surged recently due to both production (COVID-19 and labor) and transportation issues (winter weather). Although the winter weather has also started to slow demand in some regions, so far the impact has been more on the supply side. We expect that pricing will remain elevated through 2022 given the strong demand, limited supply, and lack of new capacity coming online. 2022 will see the re-start of West Fraser Allendale (+760 mmsf) partially offset by the conversion of LP Sagola to SmartSide (-420 mmsf).

Read More

Canada’s natural resources real GDP rose in Q3, forestry subsector fell

Statistics Canada
January 14, 2022
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada

Real gross domestic product (GDP) of the natural resources sector rose 2.9% in the third quarter. Real GDP of the natural resources sector has surpassed pre-pandemic levels, recovering from the 11.1% drop in the second quarter of 2020. The rise in the natural resources sector was stronger than the increase in economy-wide real GDP (+1.3%), reflecting growing demand for natural resource products as many sectors are recovering from the pandemic. …Real GDP of the forestry subsector fell 1.5% in the third quarter. This was largely due to record-setting heat, drought and forest fires in British Columbia and northwestern Ontario causing forestry and logging to decline significantly (-8.5%). Sawmill activity (-2.6%) also decreased after demand for products started declining from pandemic highs, as well as facing increased burdens from market tariffs.

Read More

Building Materials Prices Increase 1.5% in December, Lumber Volatility at 75-Year High

By David Logan
NAHB – Eye on Housing
January 14, 2022
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: United States

The prices of goods used in residential construction ex-energy climbed 1.5% in December (not seasonally adjusted), according to the latest Producer Price Index (PPI) report. The index was driven higher by large price increases for wood products. Building materials prices increased 15.9% in 2021 and have risen 18.6% since December 2020. Since declining 1.8% between July and August 2021, the index has climbed 4.5%. …The PPI for softwood lumber (seasonally adjusted) increased 24.4% in December and has gained 44.5% since September.  According to Random Lengths data, the “mill price” of framing lumber has roughly tripled since late August. …Record-high volatility of softwood lumber prices continues to be as problematic as high prices. The monthly change in softwood lumber prices averaged 0.3% between 1947 and 2019. In contrast, the percent change of the index has averaged 12.0% since January 2020.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Bennetts Associates creates cross-laminated timber sports hall in King’s Cross

By Tom Ravenscroft
Dezeen Magazine
January 16, 2022
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

LONDON — UK studio Bennetts Associates has used cross-laminated timber and glulam to create the lightweight King’s Cross Sports Hall, which is currently being used as the Construction Skills Centre. Set alongside Coffey Architects’ 22 Handyside Street office block, to the north of King’s Cross station in London, the sports centre was built three metres above a railway tunnel. Named the King’s Cross Sports Hall, the building’s main space is a double-height hall that can be used as four badminton courts, a basketball court, a volleyball court or a five-a-side football pitch. Initially, however, this space forms part of the King’s Cross Construction Skills Centre, which will use the building to provide construction training and apprenticeships while its permanent home is built in nearby Euston.

Read More

A scaled down Rolls-Royce Boat Tail replica out of wood

By Christopher Smith
Motor 1.com
January 14, 2022
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building

Last year, Rolls-Royce unveiled the most expensive new car ever made. Called the Boat Tail and its price was $28 million. …Now, there’s another Boat Tail in the world. It didn’t cost $28 million  but as far as we’re concerned, this two-seater is absolutely priceless. It’s another fantastic automotive creation from ND – Woodworking Art on YouTube. …This scaled-down take on the Rolls-Royce Boat Tail seats two people, and yes, you can drive it. Per the video, the project took 68 days, and the woodworking talent is properly jaw-dropping. But perhaps the coolest feature is a power-opening rear deck to reveal a hospitality tray. There’s even a stand for an umbrella, and it opens via remote control. How cool is that?

Read More

Forestry

Video: Tense scenes as old-growth logging protesters block Trans-Canada Highway at Revelstoke

By Aaron Orlando
The Revelstoke Mountaineer
January 15, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

There were some tense scenes at the Trans-Canada Highway intersection at Victoria Road in Revelstoke as old-growth logging protesters blocked the highway on the afternoon of Friday, Jan. 14. …There were some tense moments. One man got out of his truck and berated the protesters, swearing at them and grabbing a large cloth sign before throwing it onto the asphalt. Some people swore at the protesters from their cars, telling them to move, while others revved their engines and lurched at them. At one point, someone in a vehicle on Victoria Road shot a bear banger at the protesters. …Throughout most of the protest, a smaller group of about 10 men gathered at the northwest corner of the intersection and hurled insults and the occasional snowball at the protesters. …But reality is reality and the protesters have now twice created situations in Revelstoke that are de facto dangerous and could result in injury or death.

Read More

Camp near Fairy Creek watershed vacated by old-growth activists

By Kendall Hanson
Chek News
January 15, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Anti-old-growth-logging protesters have vacated one of their last remaining camps leading to the Fairy Creek Watershed. …The group also says the snow makes their roadside campsite dangerous so…they’re pulling out of one of their last remaining camps at least for the short term. “There’s no logging happening right now. Mother nature has her own blockade with the snow so we have an Indigenous-led occupation on their own territory and they’ll stay and keep watch for spring or for next actions with industry and we’ll just be waiting,” said Shawna Knight from the Rainforest Flying Squad. …“We won’t be going away. We’re simply attending to our safety at other places and we will be patrolling and checking all the access points to the territory,” said Bill Jones, a Pacheedaht elder. …The protesters say some of their members are now involved in protests on Wet’suwet’en territory while others will take a much-needed break.

Read More

B.C. First Nations push for revamp of province’s forestry policies

By Wendy Stueck
The Globe and Mail
January 17, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Over the past two years, the Ashcroft Indian Band has been pressing the British Columbia government to overhaul the province’s forestry policies, saying the current system doesn’t reflect the government’s commitment to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples or its legal obligations to them. …The effort is part of a province-wide push by First Nations to gain more influence over an industry that has shaped settlement and trade in B.C. for more than a century and remains a significant economic force. …In theory, the stage is set for First Nations to assume a major role. …The First Nations Forestry Council, an advocacy group focused on forest policy, has said the recent [government] changes are at odds with reconciliation commitments and with B.C.’s Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act. The group has called for a “reset.” …The provincial government’s revised legislation does not address revenue-sharing, FNFC executive director Charlene Higgins said. [We respect the copyrights of the source publication – full access may require a Globe and Mail subscription]

Read More

Alberta Forest Products Association warns power rates could soar

By Chris Clegg
The South Peace News
January 15, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Alberta Forest Products Association is warning Albertans that soaring energy prices are soon coming. “We see this as an issue that scares us,” said Brock Mulligan, AFPA senior vice president, at the High Prairie town council meeting. He asked council to consider supporting the forest industry to “push back” against the Alberta Electric System Operator’s proposal to redesign their tariff. Costs would increase 40 per cent for the forest industry, said Mulligan. The result is lumber companies are generating their own power to save money. With less power drawn from the grid because of this, all consumers – industrial or residential – will pay more. Mulligan disputes the claim that the redesign will save residential customers money. “The average household would see less than $1 a month in savings,” said Mulligan. “Meanwhile, large industrial consumers [such as forest companies] would see substantially higher transmission rates.”

Read More

We need a made-in-BC solution. Before it’s too late. 

Forestry FOR BC
January 17, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC government’s freeze on old-growth harvesting is leaving working families behind. BC’s value-added forestry sector employs thousands of talented British Columbians. And creates made-in-BC wood products found nowhere else in the world. Victoria’s decision will shut down these innovators and creators. Tell the government to talk directly with value-added producers — not just the vocal few. Before they kill thousands of jobs, hurt our forests and cancel our unique BC creators. We need a made-in-BC solution. Before it’s too late. To find out more go to ForestryForBC

Read More

Search for missing Indigenous logging protester grows tense in BC

By Katharine Lake Berz and Jill Moffatt
The Toronto Star
January 16, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Kevin ‘Bear’ Henry

PORT-RENFREW, BC — Family and friends of an Indigenous protester missing for seven weeks in the woods near a logging blockade on Vancouver Island lashed out Saturday at a logging company’s security for hampering their increasingly frantic search. Bear Henry, a two-spirited 37-year-old who has been protesting old-growth logging at Fairy Creek, went missing on Nov. 27. Henry’s family and friends fear the worst. …Saturday marked the first day RCMP formally allowed protesters to search logging roads where they believe Bear was travelling when they disappeared. But on Saturday afternoon, Bear’s search team was still denied entry by security officers contracted by Teal-Jones. …The search for Bear has been fraught with mistrust between Bear’s family and the RCMP. …The RCMP have made two helicopter searches for Bear over the past five weeks, according to Cpl. David Motley. …Teal-Jones denies that it has restricted access to search and rescue personnel. 

Read More

The Truck Loggers Association fact checks article

Letter by Bob Brash, Executive Director, Truck Loggers Association of BC
The Boundary Sentinel
January 14, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I read with interest, an article appearing in the December 31 edition of thenelsondaily.com (Movement to protect old-growth forests in region, province gains some traction) because while I believe discussion and debate about important issues should be encouraged – they should also be centered on the facts.  As an example, the article suggests only a small portion of old growth forests remain standing when in fact, current government data states there are 11.1 million hectares of old growth trees in British Columbia, of which about 75% are protected from harvesting because they lie outside of the timber supply area or are protected in parks.  The item also references a petition to “stop the felling of ancient trees” when in fact, iconic trees are identified, set aside and preserved as a matter of government policy in this province.

Read More

Forest seeks comments on reauthorizing two Wyoming elk feedgrounds

Billings Gazette
January 15, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

An environmental analysis is being launched to determine whether the Bridger-Teton National Forest should allow the Wyoming Game and Fish Department to continue winter elk feeding operations at Dell Creek and Forest Park. Forest Park Feedground … has been in operation since 1979. The 35-acre Dell Creek Feedground … has been used since 1975. The facilities are used between mid-November to the end of April. The Forest Service filed a notice of its intent on Friday. Among the alternatives to be examined are: continuing the current operation for another 20 years; slowly phasing out the feedgrounds; or not allowing the operations to continue. The feedgrounds are seen as a way to keep elk healthy in the winter when food is scarce. …However, concentrating the animals on feedgrounds also provides a possible breeding ground for transmission of chronic wasting disease, an always fatal infection. 

Read More

Summit County Forest Health and Fuels Cooperative receives highest Forest Service award

By Lindsey Toomer
The Summit Daily
January 16, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

COLORADO — The Summit County Forest Health and Fuels Cooperative Agreement team was named as a recipient of the U.S. Forest Service’s highest award, the Chief’s Award, along with the Colorado Fourteeners Program, in 2021. The Summit County cooperative was formed to reduce fuels in the wake of the mountain pine beetle epidemic in partnership with the Colorado State Forest Service, Denver Water, Summit County government, The Nature Conservancy and others. A news release about the award called the project “a model for community-based forest health and watershed management in Colorado and throughout the West.” …The Chief’s Award celebrates the accomplishments of individuals as well as partnerships throughout the U.S. that excel at meeting one of the agency’s four strategic goals.

Read More

New Mexico takes action on worsening wildfire risk, rebuilding forests

By Adrian Hedden
Carlsbad Current Argus
January 14, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Threats of wildfires to New Mexico’s forests could be getting worse. A report from climate change organization States At Risk showed New Mexico could grow from 15 days a year of with high wildfire risk in 2000 to 30 in 2030 and up to 40 days with increased risk by 2050. …While many wildfires are caused by lighting or other natural forms of ignition in remote areas of southern New Mexico, scientists pointed to increasingly dire drought brought on by human impacts on climate change as creating conditions where the fires could burn longer and hotter. …This week, New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department established a memorandum of understanding with New Mexico State University, University of New Mexico and New Mexico Highlands University to create the New Mexico Reforestation Center. The Center will focus on ways to recover areas around the state damaged by wildfires in recent years.

Read More

A New Film Encourages Viewers to Voice Support for Tongass National Forest

The Outside Online
January 16, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Understory, a Wild Confluence film directed by Colin Arisman and produced by Elsa Sebastian, follows three women who embark on a 350-mile sailing voyage through Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. Their goal is to document how clear-cut logging impacts the ecosystem, local communities, and the climate.  The Tongass has been heavily logged since the 1950s, when the federal government started subsidizing the state’s timber industry. Today it’s the last national forest where old-growth trees are clear-cut. In 2020, under the Trump administration, the Forest Service removed Roadless Rule protections for the Tongass, making nine million acres vulnerable to expanded logging and mining. Conservationists fear the last stands of old growth could be gone within a lifetime.

Read More

How I got here… forestry sustainability expert, Aida Greenbury

By Robin Hicks
Eco-Business
January 17, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Aida Greenbury

The outspoken former Asia Pulp and Paper executive tells Eco-Business about navigating the politics of sustainability leadership roles, and why you don’t need to be a sustainability expert to make a difference. …Aida Greenbury is one of the most well-recognised figures in Asia’s foresty and sustainability sector. Best known for her time building and running the sustainability department of Indonesian pulpwood company Asia Pulp and Paper (APP), Greenbury spent 15 years wrestling with environmental campaigners, recalcitrant internal stakeholders and government agencies, and marshalling the sustainability operations of a firm that was never far from controversy. …In a bid to shake-off the controversy, APP unveiled a landmark forest conservation policy (FCP) in 2013. …Greenbury was both the brains and muscle behind the policy, which has become recognised as one of the pulpwood sector’s most important sustainability declarations.

Read More

Global firms fall short on forest protection vows: Report

Forbes India
January 14, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Global companies and financial institutions with the highest potential for curbing deforestation are largely failing to do so, undermining pledges to protect forests made at the COP26 climate summit in November, a report said Thursday. The Forest 500 analysis by non-profit research group Global Canopy graded 350 companies most responsible for producing, using or trading commodities that drive deforestation, along with the 150 biggest banks, investment firms and pension funds that finance them. One-in-three companies assessed had no forest commitments at all, and 72 percent addressed some but not all of the forest-related commodities in their supply chains. …”Too few companies recognise the climate risks that are caused by deforestation, with few including their supply chains in their reporting,” Niki Mardas, executive director of Global Canopy Executive Directory, told AFP. …Progress is even more halting among financial firms, which provide more than $5.5 trillion every year to companies in forest-risk supply chains, according to the report.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Ottawa must work with Indigenous communities to mitigate climate disasters, experts say

By Nick Boisvert
CBC News
January 14, 2022
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

Amy Cardinal Christianson

First Nations and Indigenous communities in Canada need more support from the federal government to cope with future disasters related to climate change, according to a new report on Canada’s disaster resilience. Although people living in these communities are more likely to experience climate-related disasters, experts say not enough is being done to help them plan and prepare as Canada’s weather becomes more extreme. “The nations that I work with oftentimes feel like they’re ignored or left out,” said Amy Cardinal Christianson, a researcher with the Canadian Forest Service who studies the effect of wildfires in Indigenous communities. Christianson, who is Métis from Treaty 8 Territory in Alberta, said Indigenous communities facing a heightened risk of wildfires and other natural disasters say they’re being neglected by the government. …According to Natural Resources Canada, predominantly Indigenous communities accounted for 48 per cent of the communities evacuated due to wildfires between 1980 and 2021…

Read More

What obliterated this Northwest Territories forest? A downburst

By Sarah Sibley
Cabin Radio
January 14, 2022
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

If extreme flooding and wildfires weren’t enough for the Dehcho in 2021, another extraordinary weather event snuck by almost unnoticed. A downburst, one of the first ever recorded in the Northwest Territories, ripped through a patch of trees some 60 kilometres long and nine kilometres wide when it struck east of Fort Liard on June 29. Photographed from the air, the devastation made entire sections of forest look more like dried grass. …A downburst is not a tornado, but its aftermath can look a lot like a tornado passed through. Downbursts are powerful and fast storms with strong winds accompanied by rain, thunder, lightning, and occasionally hail. Air rushing down from the storm spreads out in unusually destructive fashion, causing the damage to trees seen on June 29. …“I don’t know of any other records of a very large blowdown like this happening up that way,” said Dr David Sills, executive director of the Northern Tornadoes Project. 

Read More

Health & Safety

Make climate change insurance mandatory

Western Standard
January 14, 2022
Category: Health & Safety
Region: Canada, Canada West

Some people have claimed weather disasters in Canada this year — from floods the forest fires — have been caused by climate change. Getting climate change insurance could be forced on Canadian homeowners, says a federal report. “We welcome and support the core findings,” Emergency Preparedness Minister Bill Blair said in a Thursday statement. Blacklock’s Reporter said the report by the Council of Canadian Academies complained too few property owners at risk of flooding have private insurance. Canadian insurers first sold overland flood coverage in 2015. Some people have claimed weather disasters in Canada this year — from floods the forest fires — have been caused by climate change. “Canada is an outlier among many advanced economies offering some form of nationalized flood insurance,” said the report. The report questioned payment of federal disaster relief to homeowners who live on flood plains and cannot or will not pay for private insurance.

Read More