Daily News for October 04, 2022

Business & Politics

Canadian Biomass’ highlights from the 2022 Wood Pellet Association of Canada conference

By Maria Church
Canadian Biomass
October 3, 2022
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Gordon Murray

Around 200 industry insiders gathered for the Wood Pellet Association of Canada (WPAC) conference to discuss the state of bioenergy and its future potential. …WPAC president Vaughan Bassett, a senior VP for Drax, said membership grew despite the supply chain disruptions and communication challenges. The association’s leadership, led by Gordon Murray, made strides in the government relations and policy fronts, safety, domestic outreach, and marketing.

  • Monique Frison of NRCan… highlighted that opportunities abound in terms of the global energy transition, Indigenous partnerships, and sustainable solutions for remote communities.
  • Julie MacDougall, BC Ministry of Forests… said their figures estimate four to six million megatons of GHG emissions are lost to slash pile burning in the province. Pellets are among the opportunities to further utilize slash pile residuals.
  • Consultant Karen Brandt, introduced the study WPAC commissioned. The authors found 100% of wood pellets made in BC come from mill residuals, bush grind and low-quality roundwood.
  • Phillippe Theriault with Tsi Del Del Enterprises said nearly one million cubic metres of fibre has been recovered – diverting what would have been burned in slash piles to products such as pellets or hog fuel.
  • Steve Kozuki said FESBC has funded 263 projects to the tune of $238 million. These projects “can be quite transformational when they become the leader in a project.”

The final three presenters of Day 1 addressed climate change mitigation from biomass, beginning with FutureMetrics president William Strauss… Ann Burton, Drax’s new build BECCS projects international lead, and Fahimeh Yazdan Panah, WPAC’s director of research and technical development. Day 2 of WPAC was all about safety.

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More Than 1,750 individuals Receive Initial Roseburg Relief Funds

Roseburg Forest Products Co.
Cision Newswire
October 3, 2022
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

WEED, Calif. — More than 1,750 survivors of the Sept. 2 Mill Fire have received payments for immediate needs such as temporary housing, transportation, food and clothing during the first three weeks of Roseburg’s $50 million Community Relief Fund. Fund administrators have paid 674 claims covering 1,769 individuals since Sept. 13 when they began processing claim applications for financial assistance at the Weed Community Center and through the Fund’s website. Households from more than half of the homes lost in the fire have received initial support. “We believe the percentage of survivors receiving funds is unprecedented for how quickly after the fire they had cash in hand for their immediate needs,” said Pete Hillan, a spokesperson for Roseburg.

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Forestry

‘Backed into a corner’: Duncan’s First Nation sues Alberta for cumulative impacts of industry

By Drew Anderson and Matt Simmons
The Narwhal
October 3, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Duncan’s First Nation in northern Alberta is suing the Alberta government for infringement of Treaty Rights, leaning heavily on a B.C. Supreme Court decision last year, which found that province liable for violations based on the cumulative impacts of industry on the Blueberry River First Nations’ territory. The lawsuit could have a profound impact in a province heavily reliant on an oil and gas industry that has caused significant cumulative impacts, including in the Peace River district that is home to Duncan’s First Nation. In B.C., the court ordered the government to sit down with Blueberry River First Nations to develop a plan to address its concerns and gave the nation the power to block new developments on its land. …The traditional territory of Duncan’s First Nation sits on oilsands deposits … but there is also extensive logging in the area, with large forest management agreements in place. 

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B.C. study shows targeting of old growth; links policy changes and logging patterns

By Brenna Owen
The Canadian Press in CTV News
October 3, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The worsening effects of climate change are compounding the historical loss of BC’s old-growth forests, says the co-author of a new paper that shows decades of logging on the province’s central coast targeted the highest-value forests first. “History tells us that we have really depleted these high-value elements of the landscape, and that we can’t keep going,” said Ken Lertzman, at Simon Fraser University.
“At the same time, (forests) have never been under greater threat from natural disturbances that are driven by a changing climate.” …That’s the reality today’s policy-making must reflect when it comes to determining how B.C.’s forests will be valued and used in years to come, Lertzman said. The paper examined more than 150 years of logging around Bella Bella on B.C.’s central coast. …The paper demonstrates how the logging industry engaged in “high-grading,” or targeting the most profitable and accessible forests first.

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Crater Lake planning prescribed burns

By Lee Juillerat
Herald and News
October 3, 2022
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

National Park Service

CRATER LAKE NATIONAL PARK — Three prescribed burns are planned in the coming days and weeks at Crater Lake National Park. The park’s fire management staff are preparing to conduct three prescribed fire projects in the park this fall along Highway 62 South, near Mazama Village and Munson Valley. According to a press release, the Highway 62 South project includes 50 acres of piles and material that were cut last year along the highway starting at the park’s southern boundary and continuing 3.5 miles to the north along the roadway. …Fire Management Officer Ed Waldon said Crater Lake’s fire managers plan to begin burning the piles in the next few weeks and will continue burning through the fall as conditions allow. “Fire management personnel will patrol and monitor the prescribed fires until they are completely extinguished,” Waldon said.”

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Drax accuses BBC Panorama of repeating “inaccurate claims” about biomass

Bioenergy Insight Magazine
October 4, 2022
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Drax was accused by a BBC Panorama investigation of cutting down environmentally-important forests, in an episode that was aired on 3 October. The BBC said it had “discovered some of the wood comes from primary forests in Canada”, whilst claiming Drax said it “only uses sawdust and waste wood”. The Panorama investigation involved analysing satellite images, tracing logging licenses and utilising drone filming. … Drax released a statement countering the BBC’s findings, stating it is “considering further action”. A Drax spokesperson said: “Canada has some of the most highly regulated forests in the world which ensures the forests in British Columbia are managed properly and provide positive benefits to nature, the climate and people.” …80% of the material used to make our pellets at Drax in Canada is sawmill residues… The rest is waste material collected from the forests which would otherwise be burned to reduce the risk of wildfires and disease.

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Enviva Releases White Paper on the Evolution of Modern Bioenergy in Heavy Industry Verticals

By Enviva Inc.
Business Wire in the Edmonton Journal
October 3, 2022
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, International

BETHESDA, Maryland — Enviva, the world’s leading producer of wood biomass, published a white paper that discusses unlocking the future of biomass beyond fossil fuels into other industrial applications, including steel, cement, lime, chemicals, and sustainable aviation fuel, among others. While Enviva’s sustainably sourced biomass is predominately used today to decarbonize power and heat generation, modern biomass will increasingly be used to reduce emissions in these hard-to-abate sectors that are responsible for nearly one-third of global CO2 emissions as governments, companies, and industry endeavor to mitigate their climate change impacts through net-zero emissions goals. All sectors ‒ including energy, construction, transportation, aviation, and food systems ‒ are looking to rapidly decarbonize, and sustainably sourced biomass is the only technologically advanced, scalable, and market-ready product poised to substantially mitigate climate change and decarbonize supply chains at large.

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World’s largest wood pellet plant opens in Lucedale

By Cory Johnson
WKRG News 5
October 3, 2022
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US East

LUCEDALE, Miss. – The world’s largest wood pellet plant is nearly fully operational in Lucedale, Mississippi. The plant is owned by Enviva Biomass, based in Bethesda, Maryland. The company has hired 90 full-time employees to support plant operations in Lucedale. The $140 million construction project supported about 400 cumulative jobs after the October 2019 groundbreaking, Enviva says. The company expects to generate an annual economic impact of $250 million in the region. The company says the Lucedale plant will support more than 200 indirect jobs in the region in adjacent industries like logging and trucking. “By utilizing low-value wood, Enviva has created a new market that, in turn, provides landowners and loggers with additional income while also incentivizing forest growth,” said Agriculture and Commerce Commissioner Andy Gipson. “We are so proud that Mississippi wood is being used in Enviva’s pellets to power homes and industry all over the world.”

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