Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily news for June 11 2021

Today’s Takeaway

Squamish First Nation calls for old-growth deferrals

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 11, 2021
Category: Today's Takeaway

On the heals of BC’s old-growth deferral on Vancouver Island, the Squamish First Nation calls for a moratorium in its territory. In related news: seniors protest in Victoria, as pro-forestry groups counter-rally in Campbell River; ENGOs crowdfund to buy forests; mothers and mother trees are said to nourish us all; and a new study says planting trees could undermine the climate fight.

In other news: Canada combats truck driver fatigue with tracking device regulation; BC implements new rules for contractor rate negotiations; Resolute invests to expand lumber output; Paper Excellence gears up for Prince Albert mill restart; NorSask, Steelworkers reach 5-year agreement; and Mitsubishi partners with Drax on carbon capture. 

Finally, architect Michael Green’s latest mass timber tower in Madison, Wisconsin.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Steelworkers, NorSask Forest Achieve Groundbreaking Recognition and Reconciliation Language in Five-year Agreement

By United Steelworkers
Business Wire
June 10, 2021
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

MEADOW LAKE, Saskatchewan–The United Steelworkers (USW) Local 1-184 and NorSask Forest Products have concluded a groundbreaking, five-year collective bargaining agreement for members at the sawmill’s operation… However, the most impactful language negotiated between the two parties is the groundbreaking recognition and reconciliation language. It reads: “NorSask Forest Products LP and the United Steelworkers union enter into this Agreement recognizing and acknowledging that we operate on the traditional lands of the Cree and Assiniboine signatories of Treaty 6 dedicated to ensuring that the spirit of Treaty 6 is honoured and respected. The parties to this Agreement understand that a primary objective of MLTC ownership is to support economic and social development in Indigenous communities. The parties to this Agreement appreciate that the Company is a primary employer in our region, and must work proactively towards removing barriers that hinder appropriate participation of Indigenous peoples in the NorSask workforce.”

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Paper Excellence builds Prince Albert team as work continues to restart pulp mill

Paper Excellence Canada
June 10, 2021
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince Albert, SK – Paper Excellence announced today that several key roles have been filled as work to restart the Prince Albert pulp mill ramps up. Charles Ray was hired as Director, Project Delivery and is responsible for ensuring the project is constructed on time, within budget and in accordance with all safety and environmental standards. …Paper Excellence has also engaged a variety of Saskatchewan-based consultants to help complete the engineering plans and environmental studies required to restart the mill …Paper Excellence recently announced local scholarships available to community and First Nations high school graduates who are living in Prince Albert and are entering their first year [of post secondary school] and a national scholarship for Métis high school graduates. Prince Albert Pulp Incorporated is expected to restart in the second half 2023, employing 200 people and creating over $300 million per year in economic benefits for Prince Albert and all of Saskatchewan.

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Paper Excellence announces commitment to Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business’s Progressive Aboriginal Relations program

Paper Excellence Canada
June 10, 2021
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Richmond, BC – Paper Excellence is pleased to announce its commitment to the Progressive Aboriginal Relations (PAR) program administrated by the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business. Established in 2001, the PAR program includes an online management and reporting tool that supports participating companies’ efforts towards progressive improvement in Aboriginal relations, and a certification program that confirms corporate performance in Aboriginal relations at the committed, bronze, silver or gold level. “Being a PAR Committed company means we are in the foundational stages of building our Indigenous Peoples relationships,” explains Graham Kissack, VP Environment, Health, Safety and Communications. “Paper Excellence’s approach is to foster meaningful and sincere partnerships with Indigenous communities to create economic prosperity, social vibrancy and environmental integrity.” The PAR Program provides a high level of assurance through the independent, third party verification of company reports in four performance areas: Leadership Actions, Employment, Business Development, and Community Relations (Engagement and Support).

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Resolute Forest Is Spending $50 Million to Expand Lumber Output

By Marcy Nicholson
BNN Markets
June 10, 2021
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Resolute Forest Products is spending $50 million to grow its lumber production after a U.S. housing boom sent demand soaring and lifted prices to record highs. The company is expanding capacity at sawmills in Ontario and Florida, it said Thursday. The funds will also go to modernizing equipment at a facility in Quebec and improving efficiency at one in Arkansas. …Resolute Forest’s projects are expected to be completed by the end of the third quarter of 2022. The company raised its 2021 capital investments guidance to $125 million from $100 million. Hamir Patel, an analyst at CIBC, said that Resolute’s chief executive officer “indicated the company has passed on sawmill acquisition opportunities” in the U.S. South this year.

More coverage from the Canadian Press: Resolute to pay special dividend, spend and cut debt

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Don’t blame COVID — soaring lumber costs hammering Americans were decades in the making

By Bruce Westerman, R-Arkansas
Fox Business News
June 10, 2021
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Wood product prices are setting new records almost daily. …While several factors play into this dynamic, one in particular has not received nearly enough attention: a decrease in timber coming off of our national forests, particularly those in the west.  U.S. Forest Service data shows just 2.5 billion board feet (BBF) were harvested in Fiscal Year 2020, down from 10.5 BBF just 30 years ago. …From 2004 to 2018, 991 mills closed or curtailed their operations due to a combination of economic conditions and lower supply. …Yet mill construction and expansion are happening in the South, where mills rely on private, not public, forests for the bulk of their supply. …So why are we opening sawmills in the South but closing them in the West? Because litigious environmental groups continue hamstringing sustainable harvesting on our national forests, while the South has a vast cache of timber on private working forests. 

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How the Surge in Lumber Prices is Affecting Landowners

By Stephen J. O’Shea
The Gilmer Mirror
June 10, 2021
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Texas — Lockdowns from the pandemic have led to some unexpected economic consequences, one of which has been a surge in lumber prices. … The result has been a case study in forest economics. Demand for lumber went up, but supply went down: consequently, costs have skyrocketed over 300%. In a simpler world, this would mean that everyday landowners who grow and harvest timber on their property have become the beneficiaries of an unexpected boon. But, as it turns out, timber prices (i.e. the price of felled trees sold to sawmills as logs) haven’t changed at all. … This divergence between the cost of timber and the cost of lumber is counter-intuitive, to say the least; but the reality is that both are part of incredibly complex, and surprisingly different, markets.

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Department of Natural Resources addressing hardwood shortage

By Paul Gottlieb
Peninsula Daily News
June 10, 2021
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Hilary Franz

The foundation is being laid for a pilot effort to provide cedar and alder to North Olympic Peninsula mills starving for raw materials, state Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz said Wednesday. The Department of Natural Resources, which she heads, is devising a program-director job description that will include input from timber industry officials … Hiring a program director to generate more cedar and alder availability for mills won’t come too soon for officials from Pacific Northwest Products LLC of Forks and Port Angeles Hardwood, who Franz pledged would take part in helping devise the new program director’s job description. The state Legislature allocated funding for a position to help DNR determine if there is more supply of hardwood and cedar salvage available on the Olympic Peninsula and in the Willapa Hills … EDC Executive Director Colleen McAleer echoed worries over potential mill closures generated by lack of raw product.

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Finance & Economics

Investment in Canadian Building Construction Rose 6.3% in April

Statistics Canada
June 10, 2021
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada

Total investment in building construction increased 6.3% to $19.9 billion. Residential construction investment performed strongly in April, rising for a 12th consecutive month. In contrast, non-residential construction has not fully returned to pre-COVID-19 levels. However, it increased by 0.9% this month. …Residential construction reported an 8.1% gain, bringing total investment to $15.3 billion in April. …Non-residential construction investment advanced 0.9% to $4.6 billion in April, continuing to post small gains for the fifth consecutive month. …Investment in institutional construction was up 1.4% to $1.2 billion. …Industrial construction investment was up 1.8% to $847 million, with the help of major ongoing construction projects in the cities of Toronto and Montréal.

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US Consumer Prices Rising at Fastest Pace in a Decade

By Jing Fu
NAHB – Eye on Housing
June 10, 2021
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: United States

The Bureau of Labor Statistics that the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose by 0.6% in May on a seasonally adjusted basis, following an increase of 0.8% in April. It marks the largest increase since June 2009. Excluding the volatile food and energy components, “core” CPI increased by 0.7% in May, after an increase of 0.9% in April. It is the largest increase during the past 39 years. …The index for shelter, which makes up more than 30% of headline CPI, rose by 0.3% in May. The index for owners’ equivalent rent increased by 0.3%, the largest gain since June 2019. …Keep in mind home prices themselves are not in CPI as they are the price of a capital good, not a value of current housing services.

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The Global Forest Industry Q1 2021

By Wood Resources International
The American Journal of Transportation
June 11, 2021
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: International

Timber Markets – The Global Sawlog Price Index has increased for three consecutive quarters to almost $79/m3 in the 1Q/21. This is substantially higher than its 25-year average. …Pulpwood Markets – The Softwood Fiber Index (SFPI) was up 1.7% q-o-q driven by higher costs for wood fiber. The Hardwood Fiber Price Index (HFPI) rose 4.6% from its 15-year low in the 2Q/20 to just over $83/odmt in the 1Q/21. …Pulp Markets – Tight pulp markets have pushed pulp prices in the 1Q/21 to the second-highest levels in 15 years. …Lumber Markets – With lumber prices reaching the stratosphere and costs for sawlogs moving up only marginally, profits for sawmills in North America and Europe were at record highs in the 1Q/21. …Biomass Markets – The forecasted growth in wood pellet production in Europe will increase competition for wood fiber and require new feedstock sources.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Michael Green Architecture reveals a mass timber tower in Madison, Wisconsin

By Matthew Marani
The Architect’s Newspaper
June 10, 2021
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Mass timber design and construction in North America is oft depicted as a coastal affair, with British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest, as well as the Northeast, taking the lead in this fast-growing sector. However, the Midwest is rapidly assuming a more prominent role in the field with particular hotspots, such as the University of Arkansas and the University of Idaho, driving the next generation of mass timber projects. Mass timber is also gaining steam towards the Great Lakes in the state of Wisconsin; the tallest timber tower in the world is currently under construction in Milwaukee and industry doyen Michael Green Architecture recently presented plans for a 14-story timber tower in Madison. The project, dubbed Baker’s Place, is backed by developer The Neutral Project, a real estate company that is attempting to establish a more sustainable model for the industry… Cross-laminated timber is being proposed for the structural system

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B.C. species used in furniture trials with high-end Vietnamese design firm

Forestry Innovation Investment
June 8, 2021
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

As Vietnam’s wood in manufacturing sector has seen incredible growth over the last few years, Forestry Innovation Investment (FII) continues to focus on opportunities for B.C. forest products within this market. As part of product trial strategies aimed at showcasing innovative furniture pieces made from B.C. softwoods, the FII Vietnam team has begun working with a leading local design group – Minh Chuong – that specializes in custom joinery and furniture pieces for retail, restaurant, resort, marine and high-end office projects. Together, Minh Chuong and FII Vietnam developed three aesthetically pleasing and ergonomically designed rocking chairs made from western hemlock, western red cedar and yellow cedar. The success of the trial was partly due to the favourable properties of western hemlock. …The success of this initial trial has led to FII Vietnam continuing to work with Minh Chuong on future projects, showcasing Canadian softwoods in a range of furniture and interior applications.

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Forestry

Old growth forest counter-rallies converge on the streets of Island city

By Marc Kitteringham
The Parksville Qualicum Beach News
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

CAMPBELL RIVER, BC — Both sides of the old growth logging issue came to a head in Campbell River on Thursday morning. What was originally going to be a small demonstration against logging old growth in solidarity with the campers at Fairy Creek, expanded as a counter-protest of pro-forest industry supporters who came out in numbers. While tensions did not boil over into violence, many demonstrators from either side argued and debated their points in the street in front of Babchuk’s office. The old growth protectors took up the space in front of Babchuk’s office, while the counter protesters stood in the street in front of the building. The two logging trucks were parked in front of the office for some time, but moved on to allow traffic to flow.

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BC Is Moving Too Slowly to Protect Northern Old Growth, Says Whistleblower

By Amanda Follett Hosgood
The Tyee
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s Forest Practices Board says it’s satisfied with the government’s response to an investigation into concerns about forestry practices in the Prince George timber supply area. But Judy Thomas, the retired provincial stewardship forester who filed the complaint that led to the investigation, says the response sidesteps the urgent need to address old-growth protection. “My biggest concern is, they’re not actually dealing with the landscape order and they’re not dealing with old growth,” Judy Thomas told The Tyee. …Thomas was initially hopeful that the Forest Practices Board investigation would lead to meaningful change for old-growth forests in the Prince George area. But she says the land-use planning process outlined in the province’s response is inadequate and won’t protect old growth. …Kevin Kriese, chair of the Forest Practices Board… expects old-growth areas will be identified first and logging deferred.

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The destruction of the last old growth forests has to stop. We must protect the mother trees

By Suzanne Simard – professor, UBC Faculty of Forestry
The Globe and Mail
June 11, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Suzanne Simard

Around the world, mothers are cherished and celebrated for the cycles of birth and nurturing of young lives. …But mothers today, and their children, fear for the future. …As an ecologist I discovered that trees are connected through below-ground fungal networks and that they communicate with each other and form complex societies similar to our families. …The biggest, oldest trees are mother trees that recognize and nourish their own kin. …One time when my daughters were young I brought them to a logging site and we watched the felling of a giant tree. …Citizens are begging our elected leaders to stop the exploitation, but the ears of politicians are filled with false assurances from corporate heads. They whisper hollow promises of employment even as mills close, jobs are lost to mechanization, and forest companies move elsewhere once the last sticks are cut and the creeks are full of silt. 

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Motorized and Industrial Use of the Columbia and Western Rail Trail

BC Forest Practices Board
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Board received a complaint from a resident of Grand Forks about motorized use and maintenance of the Columbia and Western Rail Trail. The Columbia and Western Rail Trail was an established recreation trail between Castlegar and Fife, but the designation was cancelled during the course of the investigation and it is no longer an established recreation trail. The Board looked at whether motorized use was allowed to occur on the established recreation trail, whether authorization of industrial use by Recreation Sites and Trails BC was reasonable, and whether replacement of an old culvert caused harmful materials to enter the stream. Report can be seen here

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New rules help forestry contractors succeed

By Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government is delivering on its commitment to modernize the forest sector … by making regulation changes to help forest-sector contractors stay in business, improve competitiveness and prosper. Amendments to the Timber Harvesting Contract and Subcontract Regulation create transparency in contract negotiations and improve the dispute resolution process between forest tenure holders and the contractors they hire… One change to the regulation requires licence holders to provide contractors with clearer work specifications to understand the full scope of work to negotiate their rates. “…the TLA has advocated for fairer and more sustainable means to determine the rates B.C.’s loggers are paid for their services. …these changes …will rectify the current imbalance in negotiating such rates to the benefit of the contractors and the resource communities they and their families live and work in. …this is one critical step of many to protect jobs and advance our sector to benefit all British Columbians.”

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The Cheakamus Community Forest is at a crossroads

By Brandon Barrett
Pique Newsmagazine
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

As the Fairy Creek blockades have thrust old-growth logging back into the forefront of British Columbians’ minds, the managers of Whistler’s Cheakamus Community Forest (CCF) face a longstanding dilemma. “… does the community forest want to be going after these old-growth stands anymore?” said CCF manager Simon Murray.  [T]he CCF … has been looking to transition away from old-growth for years, in part to do with a lack of remaining commercially viable trees, as well as the recognition of Whistler’s status as a tourism destination for millions of visitors a year. … But continually harvesting young, second-growth forest would bring its own ecological challenges, said Claire Ruddy, executive director for the Association of Whistler Area Residents for the Environment.  “You end up basically eating into your future old growth.” 

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Logging Deferral Won’t Remove Protesters or Distrust of Premier Horgan’s Motive

By Mike Patterson
My Cowichan Valley Now
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Green Party is pleased with Wednesday’s announcement of a two-year deferral of old-growth logging in the Fairy Creek watershed and central Walbran Valley. Premier John Horgan released a statement saying the move is consistent with the government’s “commitments to reconciliation and to protecting old-growth forests,” which he says are top priorities for the government. … Green Party leader Sonia Furstenau, the MLA for Cowichan Valley, says it’s encouraging to see the province agree to defer logging in the areas proposed by the three Nations. However, she says people need to “recognize that they are ignoring First Nations across B.C. who have been calling for deferrals and protection of old-growth in their territories.”

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Pro-forestry supporters move in on anti-old-growth logging rally

Campbell River Mirror
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A planned protest in downtown Campbell River against the logging of old-growth forests on Vancouver Island and in support of the blockades in the Fairy Creek area in southern Vancouver Island was co-opted by Campbell River-based pro-forestry supporters, including city councillors. The rally in support of protecting old growth forests from logging was set for June 10 but was joined by pro-logging industry supporters who marched to MLA Michele Babchuk’s office to show their support for forestry jobs.

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Seniors block downtown street for old-growth logging protest in Victoria

By Adam Chan
CTV News
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Approximately 200 seniors gathered on the lawn of B.C.’s legislature in Victoria on Thursday to protest old-growth logging in the province. The seniors say they’re calling for a recently approved two-year deferral of old-growth logging in areas of Vancouver Island to be extended across the entire province. Some of the seniors say they’re willing to be arrested for their beliefs, and about two dozen spread across a downtown Victoria street, blocking vehicle access. “The premier and his cabinet need to keep their election promises to implement the old-growth strategy report in its totality,” said 92-year-old Clare Lowery in a statement Wednesday. “We cannot build a future on broken promises.”… Despite the two-year deferral [in Fairy Creek and the Walbran valley], some say the suspension does not go far enough.

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Province implements new rules to assist forestry contractors

By George Henderson
mycariboonow.com
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government continues to modernize the forest sector, by protecting good jobs and making regulation changes thus keeping contractors in business. Amendments were made to the Timber Harvesting Contract and Subcontract Regulation to create transparency in contract negotiations and improve the dispute resolution process between forest tenure holders and the contractors they hire. This includes log harvesters, log haulers, and road builders, who hold replaceable contracts. One change requires license holders to provide contractors with clearer work specifications to understand the full scope of work to negotiate their rates. … Katrine Conroy, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations, and Rural Development [said], “We want to make sure forestry contractors and subcontractors can better count on a stable income, support their families, invest in their businesses and communities, and stay competitive.” The changes take effect … Thursday.

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Squamish Nation Demands Immediate Moratorium of Old-Growth Logging in its Territory

By the Squamish Nation
Cision Newswire
June 10, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

On June 10, the Squamish Nation formally gave notice to the Province of B.C. to defer old-growth logging for two years in the Nation’s 690,000 hectares while the Nation develops long-term sustainability plans. 78,000 hectares of the Nation’s old-growth forest are at risk unless the Province immediately halts new clear cuts. These forests belong to the Squamish People and were never ceded. While 44 per cent of the Squamish Nation territory’s old-growth has been protected, 56 per cent remains unprotected. … Industry and the Province are advised that the Squamish Nation does not want additional cut blocks in old forests to be proposed in future harvest plans. The Squamish Nation’s 2001 Xay Temixw Land Use Plan – developed through in-depth consultation with Squamish People, including Elders and cultural knowledge holders – articulates the importance of protecting old-growth forests of all types and the need for the Nation to be involved in the economic opportunities of harvesting.

Additional coverage in Global News by Amy Judd: Squamish Nation asks BC government to defer old-growth logging for 2 years

The Globe and Mail by Justine Hunter (subscribers only content): Squamish Nation calls on BC to halt old-growth logging in traditional territories

The Vancouver Sun by Brenna Owen: Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

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Society crowdfunds to ‘buy’ old-growth forests

Times Colonist
June 9, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

An environmental non-profit is trying an alternative tactic to prevent old-growth logging in the wider area around the the Fairy Creek watershed, near Port Renfrew. The Canadian Orca Rescue Society is launching a fundraiser this week in an attempt to crowdfund enough money to match the revenue that logging old-growth would provide to the Teal-Jones Group, the Pacheedaht First Nation and the provincial government. “…  if there’s more money in leaving the trees standing, they’ll probably leave the trees standing,” said Eric Pittman, director of the Canadian Orca Rescue Society. Pittman said they don’t know how much money they’ll have to raise, but he estimates it at more than $10 million. The group has reached out … to ask how much they would need to protect a little under 3,000 hectares in the Fairy Creek area.

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The Ad Council and USDA Forest Service Encourage Families to Make the Forest Part of Their Story

By The Ad Council
Cision Newswire
June 11, 2021
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — Ahead of National Get Outdoors Day on June 12, the USDA Forest Service and the Ad Council today announced new public service advertisements (PSAs) from the Discover the Forest campaign. Since 2009, the Ad Council and USDA Forest Service’s Discover the Forest campaign has encouraged parents and caregivers to take their families out to the forest to experience and reconnect with nature. The new creative work highlights the power of authentic storytelling to showcase the value of the forest as a place where families can deepen their connection with each other and with the outdoors. The PSAs culminate in a singular ask: make the forest part of your family’s story. …The creative aims to reach all parents and caregivers, with an emphasis on fostering a sense of connection to and belonging in nature among Black and Latino families. …The latest iteration of Discover the Forest also includes a Digital Storybook activity.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Courtenay council questions feasibility of Air Quality Improvement Plan

By Scott Stanfield
Comox Valley Record
June 10, 2021
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association of Canada has tabled an Air Quality Improvement Plan that could yield immediate, measurable effects in the Comox Valley. The three-pillared plan aims to improve air quality by using renewable, locally sourced fuel. …HPBAC director of government affairs Jeff Loder said industry is prepared to invest in a woodlot to ensure year-round access to a sustainable, dry and seasoned wood supply… The second pillar is a targeted wood stove exchange program to replace uncertified stoves and inserts with certified stoves, and to recycle old appliances. The third pillar is a public education/training program that includes wood burning clinics and in-home training. …A third request is to revoke Section 19 (Solid Fuel Burning Appliance) of Building Bylaw 3001. …Mayor Bob Wells said there is erroneous information on the website, overturntheban.ca. “I want to make sure we’re working in good faith. But I need that messaging to go away.”

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Transforming wood waste into energy: How SFU’s new biomass plant fuels our community

By Pam Lim
Simon Fraser University News
June 10, 2021
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

SFU expects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from heating by 80 per cent now that the new $33-million Corix biomass plant has begun operation. The GHG saved is equivalent to the emissions from 900 homes every year. By slashing direct emissions from operations and indirect emissions from energy purchased GHG emissions, SFU leads the way in sustainability with one of the smallest GHG footprints of any university in Canada.  “This facility will allow SFU to achieve 97 per cent of the province’s 2050 greenhouse gas target, …” says Larry Waddell, chief facilities officer, SFU.  Instead of using natural gas to heat SFU’s campus, the fully operational biomass plant, located on South Campus Road at SFU Burnaby, transforms clean wood waste, once destined for landfills, into a low carbon energy source. The plant now provides heat and hot water to most of SFU Burnaby and approximately half of the UniverCity community.

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Our Response to Climate Change Is Missing Something Big, Scientists Say

By Catrin Einhorn
The New York Times
June 10, 2021
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, International

Some environmental solutions are win-win, helping to rein in global warming and protecting biodiversity, too. But others address one crisis at the expense of the other. Growing trees on grasslands, for example, can destroy the plant and animal life of a rich ecosystem, even if the new trees ultimately suck up carbon. What to do? Unless the world stops treating climate change and biodiversity collapse as separate issues, neither problem can be addressed effectively, according to a report by researchers from two leading international scientific panels. …Businesses and countries have increasingly looked to nature as a way to offset their emissions, for example, by planting trees to absorb carbon. But the science is clear: Nature can’t store enough carbon. …The report was the first collaboration between the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services.

Additional coverage in the Financial Times by Camilla Hodgson: Tree planting could undermine fight against climate crisis, scientists warn

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Mitsubishi moves green jobs to London with new carbon capture HQ after Drax deal

By Jim Armitage
The Standard
June 10, 2021
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Japanese engineering giant Mitsubishi today pledged to move its carbon capture and storage operations to London after winning a major project to clean up emissions at the Drax power station in Yorkshire. Carbon capture and storage is seen as a key way for Britain to meet its emissions targets. …Successful implementation of CCS at major carbon emitting industries has proven elusive over the years but Drax says its tie-up with Mitsubishi would be one of the biggest projects in the world. Since the power station has moved from coal to burning pellets made from waste wood, Drax argues that, when combined with technology that takes the carbon out of the smoke it produces, the power station becomes one with “negative emissions”. …Greenpeace’s Dr Doug Parr… is concerned about how much damage is done to biodiversity of woodland and carbon emissions by the very fact of chopping down trees to create the pellets it burns.

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Health & Safety

‘A great day’: Electronic logging devices becoming mandatory in semi trucks in Canada to combat driver fatigue

By Vera-Lynn Kubinec and Caroline Barghout
CBC News
June 11, 2021
Category: Health & Safety
Region: Canada

A new era in highway safety regulation begins in Canada on Saturday as electronic logging devices that track a driver’s hours behind the wheel become mandatory in semi trucks travelling between provinces. The electronic logging devices (ELDs) replace the use of paper log books and effective June 12 are a requirement under a federal regulation aimed at preventing fatigue in commercial drivers. The regulation covers commercial trucks and buses that cross provincial and territorial boundaries. Industry advocates welcome the change.  “It’s going to force [non-compliant trucking companies] to get into the game and be compliant and be safe or face the consequences,” Canadian Trucking Alliance president Stephen Laskowski said. …”It’s going to make Canadian roads safer and it’s going to make it a better industry to work in.”

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Gordon remembers deceased Wyoming smokejumper; urges caution with ‘dangerous’ 2021 wildfire outlook

By Brendan LaChance
Oil City News
June 10, 2021
Category: Health & Safety
Region: United States, US West

CASPER, Wyo. — Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon began the 2021 “Wyoming Wildfire Briefing” on Thursday with a moment of silence for Wyoming smokejumper Tim Hart. Hart, a smokejumper from the West Yellowstone Smokejumper base in Montana, passed away June 2 from injuries sustained in a hard landing while responding to the Eicks Fire in Hildago County, New Mexico. Later in the briefing on Thursday, Gordon highlighted the need for the public to exercise caution this summer with wildfire officials reporting slightly worse conditions heading into the 2021 season compared with 2020. …The governor said that every dollar which has to be spent on wildfire suppression takes away funding that could be spent on other purposes such as maintaining campgrounds, managing forests or constructing roads. He added that wildfires can put people’s, particularly firefighters, lives at risk, adding: “It is incredible this summer how dangerous these fire conditions are.”

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